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The song starts as Nicely brags about the named Paul Revere who he believes can win the race. Benny Southstreet joins in and shows off Valentine, the horse of his choosing. Finally, Rusty Charlie brings up his horse, Epitaph, that he thinks will win. All three list reasons why their horse would win.
 
The song starts as Nicely brags about the named Paul Revere who he believes can win the race. Benny Southstreet joins in and shows off Valentine, the horse of his choosing. Finally, Rusty Charlie brings up his horse, Epitaph, that he thinks will win. All three list reasons why their horse would win.
   
This song works in tandem with "Runyonland" in creating the atmosphere of New York. It also demonstrates the viewer how obsessed the male cast is with gambling.
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This song works in tandem with "Runyonland" in creating the atmosphere of New York. It also demonstrates to the viewer how obsessed the male cast is with gambling.
   
 
==Lyrics==
 
==Lyrics==

Latest revision as of 18:51, May 4, 2019

RustNiceBen

Rusty Charlie, Nicely-Nicely Johnson and Benny Southstreet

Fugue for Tinhorns is the first song in the musical Guys and Dolls. It is performed by Nicely-Nicely Johnson, Benny Southstreet and Rusty Charlie.

Song MeaningEdit

The song starts as Nicely brags about the named Paul Revere who he believes can win the race. Benny Southstreet joins in and shows off Valentine, the horse of his choosing. Finally, Rusty Charlie brings up his horse, Epitaph, that he thinks will win. All three list reasons why their horse would win.

This song works in tandem with "Runyonland" in creating the atmosphere of New York. It also demonstrates to the viewer how obsessed the male cast is with gambling.

LyricsEdit

Nicely: I got the horse right here, the name is Paul Revere. And here's a guy that says if the weather's clear, can do. Can do. This guy says the horse can do. If he says the horse can do. Can do. Can do. (While Benny starts) Can do. Can do. This guy says the horse can do. If he says the horse can do. Can do. Can do. (Rusty starts) For Paul Revere I'll bite, I here his foots all right. Of course it all depends if it rained last night. Likes mud, likes mud, this "X" says the horse likes mud. If that means the horse likes mud. Likes mud. Likes mud. I tell you Paul Revere, now this is no bum steer, it's from a handicapper that's real sincere. Can do. Can do. This guy says the horse can do. (After "Valentine!") Paul Revere! (Together) I got the horse. Right. Here!

Benny: I'm pickin' Valentine, 'cause on the mornin' line, the guy has got him figured at five-to-nine. (While Rusty sings) Has chance. Has chance. This guys says the horse has chance. If he says the horse has chance. Has chance. Has chance. (After "rained last night) I know it's Valentine, the morning works look fine, besides the jockey's brother's a friend of mine. Needs race. Needs race. This guy says the horse needs race. If he says the horse needs race. Needs race. Needs race. I go Valentine, 'cause on the mornin' line, the guy has got him figured at five-to-nine. Has chance. Has chance. Has chance. This guy says the horse has chance. (After "Epitaph!") Valentine! (After "Paul Revere!", together) I got the horse. Right. Here!

Rusty: But look at Epitaph, he wins it by a half, according to this here in the Telegraph. "Big Threat." "Big Threat." This guy calls the horse "Big Threat." If he calls the horse "Big Threat." "Big Threat. "Big Threat." (After "friend of mine") And just a minute boys, I got the feed box noise, it says his great-grandfather was Equipoise. Shows class. Shows class. This guy says the horse shows class. If he says the horse shows class. Shows class shows class. (After "five-to-nine") So make it Epitaph! He wins it by a half, according to this here in the Telegraph. Epitaph! (After "Paul Revere!", together) I got the horse. Right. Here!

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